Posts Tagged With: Thanksgiving

The Last Minute Pumpkin Pie

Pumpkin Pie | The Mountain KitchenI know, I know, Thanksgiving is over and you’re sick and tired of everything pumpkin, but I just had to share my first experience making pumpkin pie from scratch, well almost…

It has been two years since I had a pumpkin pie on Thanksgiving and it seems that every time I went into our local farmers’ market those little pie pumpkins would taunt me every time. Well, I broke down and bought one of those little dudes and took him home to make a pie. I used a Nancy Fuller recipe. She has a show that I record called “Farmhouse Rules”. It is a fairly new show, so if you haven’t seen it check it out. She’s a hoot!

Here’s how I made pumpkin pie from scratch, minus the damned crust (After my latest experience with pastry dough, I am not ready for that again, yet):

Pumpkin Pie

  • Servings: 8
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Pumpkin Pie | The Mountain Kitchen

Ingredients:

Pumpkin:

  • 1 medium sugar pumpkin (about 3 pounds)
  • Canola oil, for oiling pumpkin

Easy Pie Crust:

  • Store bought pie crust

Filling:

  • One 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk
  • 1/2 cup whipping cream
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 2 tablespoons molasses
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3 large eggs

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.Pumpkin Pie | The Mountain Kitchen
  2. Remove the stem from the pumpkin and scrape out the insides, discarding the seeds.
  3. Cut the pumpkin in half and lay the pieces cut-side down on a baking sheet lined with aluminum foil. Rub canola oil all over the skin. Bake until fork-tender, about 1 hour. Let cool.Pumpkin Pie | The Mountain Kitchen Pumpkin Pie | The Mountain Kitchen
  4. Blind bake the pie crust according to package directions. Once the crust is done, remove it from the oven and reduce the oven temperature to 350 degrees F.
  5. Scoop out the pulp from the roasted pumpkin and puree in a food processor until smooth (you should have about 4 cups). Pumpkin Pie | The Mountain Kitchen
  6. Add the condensed milk, cream, cornstarch, molasses, canola oil, cinnamon, ginger, salt and eggs and combine thoroughly.
  7. Pour the filling into the crust and bake until the filling is set in the center, about 1 hour.Pumpkin Pie | The Mountain Kitchen
  8. Transfer the pie to a rack and cool for at least 30 minutes. Serve at room temperature or chilled.Pumpkin Pie | The Mountain Kitchen

I know that dumping pumpkin out of the can is easy, but roasting a pumpkin to prepare for this pie really was simple. This recipe was great! The pie came out velvety smooth and cooked to perfection. Of course, my sweet husband doesn’t like it. I ended up sending some to my step-son who thought is was pretty good too. Turns out pumpkins are good to eat and not just good for rolling down hills. 😉

Do you like pumpkin pie? Have you ever made it from scratch?

DMS

Categories: Sweet Tooth Recipes, The Mountain Kitchen Recipes | Tags: , , , , , | 25 Comments

Get Your Roll On!!

ONE

Last year we did this in our jammies, but this year we decided to gussy up a bit and capture our annual pumpkin roll on camera to share with you. Watch and see who wins…

We had to rescue the pumpkins from the Thanksgiving snow, so they would not rot before we could roll them. I really did make a pumpkin pie from scratch before rolling our pumpkins down the hill. Recipe to come. Stay tuned…

DMS

Categories: Worth The Blog | Tags: , , , , , | 27 Comments

‘Twas the Day Before Thanksgiving

IMG_20141126_165546_343-1‘Twas the day before Thanksgiving… a snow storm was on the way to the mountains.

David and I both had to work. We were going to be driving outside of the edge of the storm to work, where there was hardly any threat of accumulation. We left for work in the truck in the pouring rain. We feared if we were to take the car we wouldn’t be able to get back on the mountain upon our return.

FLASHBACK: We actually got snowed off the mountain one evening last winter. The weather man had said the snow would start well after we had gotten home that evening. Turns out that weather man was wrong (What else is new?). It started snowing before we could get home. When we reached our road at the bottom of the mountain, Magoo (our commuter car) wanted no parts in climbing a mountain in the snow. We called our neighbor to see if our road was being plowed and hadn’t been worked on at the bottom yet. He did not know, so we decided to park the car at the park down the road and walk. His Royal Highness was awaiting our arrival and had the crock pot going all day. Supper was ready too! We had to get to the house no matter what. As we began to walk down the snow covered road, a man stopped his truck to see if we needed a lift. We told him where we were going and he agreed to take us up the mountain. What a good samaritan he was. Not only was he going to attempt to take us home, risking the chance of a potential accident, but he didn’t even live up our part of the mountain. As we began to make the climb up, our neighbor called. He was coming down after us! I told him we were just about up to where he was and to wait there for us. Being that our driveway is very difficult to turn around in on a clear day, we had the good samaritan drop us off in a place easy for him to turn around. It was only about a few hundred yards for us to hoof it to reach our neighbor who was waiting to carry us the rest of the way. We thanked the kind man who generously took us up the mountain. David even tried to pay him, but he refused. We walked up the snow covered road and reached our neighbor who was waiting with his vehicle. He dropped us off at our driveway and then went back home. Had it not been for the good samaritan or our wonderful neighbor, it would have taken us quite a while to climb the mountain in the snow. Thank goodness for those two men! That will not happen again. Any threat of snow and we will be taking the truck!

While at work I kept an eye on the radar and cleared the weather alerts from my phone a hundred times. I looked at some of the social media sites to keep in touch with what was happening back home. My neighbor posted a video showing the snow fall. In 4 1/2 hours the rain had switched to snow and by 10:00 a.m. there was about 4 inches of snow on the rail of his deck. Outside at work, it had only begun to mix and change over to snow.

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Me being stupid.

Fortunately, David and I both got to leave early for the holiday that afternoon. When we left from work, it was snowing hard and it was just beginning to stick. Even though David offered to drive, I refused to let him. After our accident over near Bull Run, I feel like I am more in control and prefer to drive myself. David would have to sedate me to have any sanity on the way home anyway.

IMG_20141126_155123_125-1As we drove further west towards the mountains, the ground got whiter and whiter, but the roads were clear. It was almost 70 degrees two days prior and the ground was still really warm, our saving grace! IMG_20141126_155805_516-1We reached the bottom of our mountain and locked the truck into 4-wheel drive to make the climb.

IMG_20141126_160758_092-1The road had been plowed, but it had been a while. The trees limbs hung low due to weight of the accumulating snow. Some even brushed the top of the truck as I drove under them. The snow in the road was a bit slushy and the truck got good traction all the way up without slipping.IMG_20141126_160746_861-1 We had almost reached our house, when three turkeys crossed the road in front of us. I was beginning to think that may be the only way we would get a turkey on the table for Thanksgiving.IMG_20141126_160931_298-1I pulled into the drive way and eased down the hill. We were greeted by about 6 inches of snow!

IMG_20141126_161505_028-1Luckily we made the right decision and left Magoo at home! He would have never been able to climb up the mountain in the snow.IMG_20141126_170021_963-1The temperature was right at 30 degrees and was supposed to drop that night. IMG_20141126_174807_048-1We made a fire and I couldn’t help but to go outside in the snow for a few pictures while it was still light. I can’t help it, I love the snow. It makes me feel like a little kid and it is so pretty!IMG_20141126_165607_180-1We would have to wait and see how things were in the morning light before we knew if we would make it to my mama’s for Thanksgiving.

Every year, we go down to my mama’s house for her Thanksgiving feast. I have had mama’s food every year for Thanksgiving since birth. Not going home for Thanksgiving would have broken my heart. She’s 73 and still does all of the thanksgiving cooking herself. She is really something else! I only hope I can cook and do half of what she does at her age.

IMG_20141127_081528_859-1We woke up Thanksgiving morning to a thick fog that blanketed the mountain. We could hardly see past the deck rail. We decided to wait for the fog to burn off before attempting to leave. The same turkeys we saw crossing the road the evening before made another appearance in our yard at the edge of the woods. They were lucky snow turkeys I guess…Thanksgiving TurkeysThe fog began to burn off slowly and by the time we left the roads were clear.

1525626_764944876886763_4119840793544092657_n IMG_20141127_093827_294-1
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IMG_20141127_094142_685-1We arrived late for my mama’s awesome cooking. Fortunately, we got to see the whole family and my sister-in-laws parents, who we had not seen in a long time. We had a great Thanksgiving with family.

Friday, David went hunting and I relaxed and visited with my mama. We returned home that night to find that the snow was still laying on the ground. I guess this winter is going to be as bad as they are predicting being that we have already gotten our first snow. Oh well, we will take it as it comes. If we moved up on a mountain and didn’t see snow we would be mad.IMG_20141129_074437_894-1

His Royal Highness begged for his Mema’s turkey. He loves that stuff!IMG_20141129_080059_616-1

I hope everyone had a safe and blessed Thanksgiving as we did.

DMS

Categories: Worth The Blog | Tags: , , , , | 29 Comments

Closed For the Thanksgiving Holiday

CLOSED

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Happy Thanksgiving From The Mountain Kitchen

Happy Thanksgiving

Categories: Worth The Blog | Tags: | 6 Comments

FOOD FACT FRIDAY ~ Pumpkin

FFF PumpkinHere are 15 facts you may not have known about pumpkins:

  1. Pumpkins originated in Central America.
  2. The name pumpkin comes from the Greek word ‘pepon’, meaning ‘large melon’.
  3. Pumpkins are usually orange but can sometimes be yellow, white, green or red.
  4. Pumpkins are usually shaped like a sphere (ball) that have thick shells which contain pulp and seeds.
  5. Pumpkin plants feature both male and female flowers, with bees typically being involved in pollination (the transfer of pollen)
  6. Scientifically speaking, pumpkins are a fruit (they contain seeds) but when it comes to cooking, they are often referred to as vegetables.
  7. Pumpkins are 90 percent water, but they are full of nutrients. 100 grams of pumpkin produces around 26 calories of energy and contain potassium and Vitamin A.
  8. Pumpkin flowers are edible, but if you eat the flower, there will be no pumpkin.
  9. As a food, pumpkin can be baked, roasted, steamed or boiled.
  10. Pumpkin pie is a sweet dessert that originates in North America and is traditionally eaten during harvest time and holidays such as Thanksgiving and Christmas.
  11. In early colonial times, pumpkins were used as an ingredient for the crust of pies, not the filling.
  12. Pumpkins are popular decorations during Halloween. The tradition of a carved pumpkin illuminated by candles, called a ‘jack-o-lantern’ is believed to have come from Ireland. There they carved faces into turnips, beet and other root vegetables as part of the Gaelic festival of Samhain.
  13. Pumpkins were once recommended for removing freckles and curing snake bites.
  14. Native Americans used pumpkin seeds for food and medicine. They also flattened strips of pumpkins, dried them and made mats.
  15. This year the largest pumpkin ever grown weighed 2,058-lb. It squashed the previous US record.

Since my birthday is on Halloween, I love pumpkins as decorations and as food. As a child, my daddy used to call me “Pumpkin”.

Next week is Thanksgiving here in the US. I wonder if my mama will have any pumpkin pie this year? What is your favorite pumpkin dish?

Get to know your food!

DMS

P.S. David and I will be having our annual pumpkin roll next week (if our pumpkins do not get too mushy). We take our decorative pumpkins and roll them down the mountain and see who’s goes the farthest. It may sound childish, but it is a lot of fun!! I hope one of these years we actually plant a seed by accident.  Stay tuned… 🙂

Categories: FOOD FACT FRIDAY | Tags: , , , , , | 20 Comments

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